How Easy Is It To Get Approved For An FHA Loan?

Why would FHA not approve a home?

If the appraisal “comes in low” (meaning the house appraises for less than the purchase price), then the FHA probably won’t approve the home for financing.

Depending on the situation, the homeowner /seller might be willing to reduce the sale price to reflect the appraisal amount..

What are my chances of getting approved for an FHA loan?

FHA’s guidelines are much less restrictive. They allow loan approval with a FICO score as low as 580 and just 3.5 percent down, and a score down to 500 with 10 percent down. … You can see that the program is much more forgiving, with the majority of approvals going to applicants with FICO scores of 600 or better.

How do you get approved for an FHA loan?

How To Qualify For An FHA LoanHave verifiable income. … Be able to afford the housing payment AND any existing debt. … Save at least a 3.5% down payment. … Have an established credit history. … Have a FICO score of at least 580-640. … Purchase a home that does not exceed FHA loan limits. … Apply for the correct type of FHA loan.More items…

Can you be denied a FHA loan?

There are three popular reasons you have been denied for an FHA loan–bad credit, high debt-to-income ratio, and overall insufficient money to cover the down payment and closing costs.

What disqualifies an FHA loan?

1. Credit score. According to the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), you need a credit score of at least 500 to be eligible for an FHA loan. … But most want to see a credit score of 600 or higher. If you fall well below this range, you might be denied for an FHA loan.

What is the downside of an FHA loan?

Higher total mortgage insurance costs. Borrowers pay a monthly FHA mortgage insurance premium (MIP) and upfront mortgage insurance premium (UFMIP) of 1.75% on every FHA loan, regardless of down payment. A 20% down payment eliminates the need for PMI on a conventional purchase loan.

Why are FHA loans bad?

Downsides of FHA loans Not only do you have to fork over an upfront MIP payment of 1.75% of your loan amount, but you must also pay an annual premium that works out to around . 85% of your loan. Worse, FHA borrowers typically pay these premiums for the entire life of their mortgage — even if it lasts 30 years.

Why do sellers not like FHA loans?

Sellers often believe, too, that buyers who need a lower down payment might not be able to afford any home repairs. Sellers worry that FHA buyers because of their lack of cash might be more willing to walk away from an offer if the home inspection turns up any problems. For FHA buyers, these are both cause for concern.